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The Boho and Disco-Chic ’70s: Guest Blogger

Sometimes, our greatest inspirations for new looks come from the past. Which is why we love The American Vernacular, a recently launched (it started last November!) online vintage store with fantastic, bygone-era inspired taste. Each piece on the site comes with information about its brand history, written by TAV’s owner and founder, Bryn Lander. This week, Bryn shares her vintage style secrets with us and gives the downlow on how to score those glam, leading lady looks.

Top: Diane Keaton, Liza Minnelli, Ali MacGraw, Faye Dunaway
Bottom: Pam Grier, Jerry Hall, Lauren Hutton, Bianca Jagger

During the ’70s, liberated women had more choices and fewer social constraints than ever before, producing two very distinct styles.

The eclectic boho style that stemmed from the ’60s hippie look became part of high fashion by the mid-’70s, when designers like Yves Saint Laurent, Ossie Clark, and Thea Porter created the ‘haute peasant look.’ The was also the decadent and glamourous style associated with Studio 54 and disco, which was largely defined by designers like Halston, Bill Blass, and Diane von Furstenberg, who experimented with draped jersey knits to create distinct silhouettes like the open-back halter neck, flowing maxi dresses, catsuits, and wrap dresses. My favorite iconic fashion films of the era are Love Story (1970), Cabaret (1972), Chinatown (1974), Shampoo (1975), Mahogany (1975) and Annie Hall (1977).

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Look ’60s Chic With These Key Pieces: Guest Blogger

Sometimes, our greatest inspirations for new looks come from the past. Which is why we love The American Vernacular, a recently launched (it started last November!) online vintage store with fantastic, bygone-era inspired taste. Each piece on the site comes with information about its brand history, written by TAV’s owner and founder, Bryn Lander. This week, Bryn shares her vintage style secrets with us and gives the downlow on how to score those glam, leading lady looks.

Top: Twiggy, Jane Fonda, Mia Farrow, Barbara Streisand
Bottom: Edie Sedgwick, Diana Ross, Jean Shrimpton, Brigitte Bardot

Sixties culture was defined by the baby boomers who were just starting to come of age. Designers like Mary Quant, Courrèges, Pierre Cardin, Rudi Gernreich, Emilio Pucci, Bonnie Cashin, Givenchy, and the House of Biba challenged every tradition of fashion design and created the miniskirt, bold Warhol- and Mondrian-inspired prints, and dresses made of materials like plastic and paper. My favorite ’60s films that best showcase the looks of the era are Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), The Birds (1963), Bonnie and Clyde (1967), The Graduate (1967), and Rosemary’s Baby (1968).

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Get The Screen Siren ’50s Look: Guest Blogger

Sometimes, our greatest inspirations for new looks come from the past. Which is why we love The American Vernacular, a recently launched (it started last November!) online vintage store with fantastic, bygone-era inspired taste. Each piece on the site comes with information about its brand history, written by TAV’s owner and founder, Bryn Lander. This week, Bryn shares her vintage style secrets with us and gives the downlow on how to score those glam, leading lady looks.

Top: Audrey Hepburn, Sophia Loren, Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor. Bottom: Grace Kelly, Dorothy Dandridge, Bettie Page, Doris Day

The ’50s was a transition period between the rigid and conformist World War II era to the individualistic, youth-oriented culture of the ’60s. Several distinct styles emerged during this time and helped define the style of the decade. Icons like Grace Kelly and Doris Day represented the demure and conservative feminine ideal while the glamorous and provactive look of Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, Sophia Loren, and Brigitte Bardot made them sex symbols. Audrey Hepburn became a style icon and muse to many designers for her distinct easy elegance that was both classic and modern. She, amazingly, exuded the same graceful confidence in a turtleneck, pedal pushers, and ballet flats as she did in full-skirted lace gowns. Some of my favorite films that define the era are All About Eve (1950), Rear Window (1954), And God Created Woman (1956), Funny Face (1957) and Some Like It Hot (1959).

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